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Elevated levels of soluble CD40 ligand are associated with antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

1, 2, 3, 4, 5

  1. Division of Rheumatology, St. Vincent Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
  2. Division of Rheumatology, Yeouido St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  3. Division of Rheumatology, Uijeongbu St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu, Republic of Korea.
  4. Division of Rheumatology, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  5. Division of Rheumatology, Yeouido St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea. chocs@catholic.ac.kr

CER10153 Submission on line
2017 Vol.35, N°5 - PI 0823, PF 0830
Full Papers

Rheumatology Article

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
The CD40L/CD40 pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of atherothrombotic disease, and elevated levels of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) were reported in SLE patients. However, the clinical implication of sCD40L in SLE remains elusive.
METHODS:
We measured levels of plasma sCD40L in 241 SLE patients and 37 healthy controls and investigated its association with clinical manifestation and laboratory parameters.
RESULTS:
Levels of plasma sCD40L in SLE patients were significantly elevated compared with healthy controls (p=0.013) and positively correlated with levels of soluble P-selectin (γ=0.336, p<0.001). SLE patients who experienced arterial thrombosis had a higher level of sCD40L than those who did not (p=0.029). Plasma sCD40L levels were positively correlated with the titers of anti-cardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies (γ=0.338, p<0.001 and γ=0.364, p<0.001, respectively). Its levels were also significantly higher in patients with clinical antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) than in non-APS patients, irrespective of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity. Of those with arterial thrombosis, sCD40L levels were significantly elevated in patients with positive aPL, compared to those with negative aPL (p=0.011). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of hypertension and positive aPL were independently associated with the occurrence of arterial thrombosis in SLE patients. A parallel analysis showed that sCD40L was also an independent variable for arterial thrombosis; however, this association disappeared when aPL, a strong variable, was included in the model because of collinearity between aPL and sCD40L.
CONCLUSIONS:
Plasma sCD40L levels were elevated in SLE patients who had positive aPL and experienced arterial thrombosis, suggesting that enhanced release of sCD40L through platelet activation presumably by aPL could contribute to the development of atherothrombotic disease.

PMID: 28421990 [PubMed]

Received: 06/12/2016 - Accepted : 13/02/2017 - In Press: 18/04/2017 - Published: 15/09/2017