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Association between perceived level of stress, clinical characteristics and psychopathological symptoms in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

  1. Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Granada; and Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), Granada, Spain.
  2. Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, Spain. josemapm@ugr.es
  3. Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Granada, Spain.
  4. Department of Health Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Alicante, Spain.
  5. Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Granada; and Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), Granada, Spain.
  6. Hospital Campus de la Salud, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario, Granada, Spain.
  7. Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals, Granada, Spain.
  8. San Rafael University Hospital, Granada, Spain.
  9. Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals, Granada, Spain.
  10. Hospital Campus de la Salud, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario, Granada, Spain.
  11. Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals, Granada, Spain.
  12. Hospital Campus de la Salud, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario, Granada, Spain.

CER10261 Submission on line
2018 Vol.36, N°3 - PI 0434, PF 0441
Full Papers

Rheumatology Article

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate psychopathological status and stress level from a sample with SLE; compare mental functioning and stress levels between women with SLE and healthy women; determine whether disease duration, disease activity, cumulative organ damage and stress have an influence on psychopathological symptoms in SLE patients; and evaluate whether perception of stress is related to SLE severity.
METHODS:
We conducted a cross-sectional study of 425 participants; 202 women with SLE, with an average age (SD) of 36.61 (10.15), and 223 healthy women, with age-matched controls. The assessment included the clinical characteristics (disease duration, SLE activity, cumulative organ damage, pharmacotherapy), the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Perceived Stress Scale. Descriptive, comparative, univariate and multivariate analysis were performed.
RESULTS:
SLE patients showed psychopathological alterations in the somatisation, obsessive-compulsive and positive discomfort subscales of SCL-90-R. Women with SLE reported significantly higher scores on the psychopathological dimensions and perceived stress compared to healthy women, except for paranoid ideation. Disease duration, SLE activity, cumulative organ damage, and perceived stress were shown to be significant predictors of psychopathological manifestations, explaining a range, between 20 and 43%, of variance across SCL-90-R dimensions. Moreover, perceived stress was related to SLE activity, after controlling for psychopathological dimensions.
CONCLUSIONS:
The psychopathological manifestations in SLE appeared to be influenced by perceived stress, disease duration, disease activity and cumulative organ damage. In turn, perceived stress was associated with disease severity. This knowledge may contribute to a more comprehensive perspective of these manifestations in the SLE population in the clinical setting.

PMID: 29352848 [PubMed]

Received: 17/01/2017 - Accepted : 20/09/2017 - In Press: 15/01/2018 - Published: 17/05/2018