Logo

Variable impacts of different remission states on health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis

1, 2, 3, 4, 5

  1. Academic Department of Rheumatology, Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Disease, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, UK. margaret.ma@nhs.net
  2. Academic Department of Rheumatology, Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Disease, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, UK.
  3. Academic Department of Rheumatology, Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Disease, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, UK.
  4. Academic Department of Rheumatology, Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Disease, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, UK.
  5. Academic Department of Rheumatology, Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Disease, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, UK.

CER10269 Submission on line
2018 Vol.36, N°2 - PI 0203, PF 0209
Full Papers

Rheumatology Article

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Targeting remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and disability. However, the impacts of different remission criteria and durations and their frequencies are uncertain. Our observational study assessed these factors.
METHODS:
We recruited RA patients with disease durations <10 years, stable suppressive therapies and stable disease activity scores for 28 joints using ESR (DAS28-ESR) ≤3.2. Intermittent and sustained remisisons were classified using DAS28ESR, simple disease activity index (SDAI) and ACR/EULAR Boolean criteria. HRQoL, measured using SF-36, fatigue, EuroQol and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) was compared using time-integrated areas under the curve (AUC).
RESULTS:
104 patients were enrolled and followed for 12 months. DAS28-ESR remissions were intermittent in 42%, sustained in 47% and absent in 11%. Boolean remissions were intermittent in 38%, sustained in 10% and absent in 52%. Baseline remissions by all criteria significantly improved HAQ, Euroqol, SF36 and fatigue scores compared with low disease activity (LDAS); AUCs showed significant benefits for all HRQoLs persisted over 12-months. Boolean remissions achieved most benefits. Over time all remission states gave significantly better HRQoL scores than LDAS. Sustained DAS28ESR and SDAI remissions improved HRQoL more than intermittent remissions. Sustained and intermittent Boolean remissions gave similar improvements. Analysis of SF-36 domains showed even sustained Boolean remissions failed to optimise pain and fatigue.
CONCLUSIONS:
All remissions improve HRQoL but different criteria have variable impacts. Boolean remission had most impact but occurred least. There are trade-off between optimising individual impacts (Boolean remissions) and achieving maximal overall impacts (DAS28-ESR remissions).

PMID: 29148413 [PubMed]

Received: 21/01/2017 - Accepted : 08/06/2017 - In Press: 23/10/2017 - Published: 18/04/2018