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The role of catastrophising in rheumatic diseases

1, 2

  1. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  2. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Jhaytho1@jhmi.edu

CER10790 Submission on line
2017 Vol.35, N°5 ,Suppl.107 - PI 0032, PF 0036
General concepts. Pain in musculoskeletal diseases

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Rheumatology Article

 

Abstract

Pain is a common and debilitating symptom of many rheumatic diseases. Decades of research have shown that psychological factors are critical in shaping the experience of acute and chronic pain. The current review focuses on pain catastrophising, a cognitive and emotional response to pain, and its implication for the assessment and treatment of individuals with rheumatic diseases. Catastrophising is one of the most salient psychosocial predictors of a host of pain-related outcomes including heightened disability and depression, increased use of opioids, reduced response to treatment and increased chance of long-term postoperative pain. Despite being stable without treatment, catastrophising can be reduced though psychological and non-psychological interventions. Mechanisms of action including physiological, cognitive-behavioural, and social routes are discussed and a comprehensive developmental model of the combined effects of catastrophising, its biological effects and pain is suggested. Identifying patients at risk for poor outcomes through the assessment of catastrophising could enable providers to individually tailor treatment plans and improve clinical outcomes.

PMID: 28967374 [PubMed]

Received: 06/09/2017 - Accepted : 06/09/2017 - In Press: 28/09/2017 - Published: 29/09/2017