31 October 2014
 

Differences in biologic dose-escalation, non-biologic and steroid intensification among three anti-TNF agents: evidence from clinical practice

Purchase this articleRheumatology Article

R. Moots, B. Haraoui, M. Matucci-Cerinic, P. van Riel, J. Kekow, T. Schaeverbeke, A. Davis, M. Tedeschi, B. Freundlich, D. Chang, A. Singh

University of Liverpool Academic Rheumatology Unit, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, UK. rjmoots@liv.ac.uk

CER3958 Submission on line
Full Paper

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate prevalence of dose escalation among RA patients in normal clinical practice treated with etanercept, adalimumab or infliximab and to estimate its economic impact.
METHODS:
A retrospective observational study of 739 patients with RA receiving continuous treatment with etanercept (n=319), adalimumab (n=313) or infliximab (n=107) for 18 months. Dose escalation, intensification of concomitant DMARDs and risk of dose escalation were evaluated, as well as costs.
RESULTS:
Significantly more patients prescribed adalimumab (10%, p<0.001) or infliximab (35%, p<0.001) experienced dose escalation compared with patients treated with etanercept (3%). DMARD or steroid dose adjustment, when added as criteria of escalation, occurred more often among patients treated with adalimumab (28%; p=0.022) or infliximab (47%; p<0.001) than those prescribed etanercept (19%). Independent of confounding covariates, hazard of dose escalation was significantly higher for either infliximab (28.1-fold) or adalimumab (4.9-fold) relative to etanercept. Escalation among subjects treated with either infliximab or adalimumab incurred statistically significant increases in total cost of care compared with non-escalators whereas such differences observed for subjects treated with etanercept were not significant.
CONCLUSIONS:
Patients receiving monoclonal antibody therapies, adalimumab or infliximab, had significantly higher rates of dose escalation than patients receiving the soluble TNF receptor, etanercept, and related costs were higher.

PMID: 21345289 [PubMed]

Received: 28/06/2010 - Accepted : 05/10/2010 - In Press: 23/02/2011 - Published: 23/02/2011

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