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Examination of the association of sex and race/ethnicity with appearance concerns: a Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network (SPIN) Cohort study


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

 

  1. Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal; and Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  2. Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; and Behavioural Science Institute, Clinical Psychology, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
  3. Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  4. Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; and San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, USA.
  5. McGill University, Health Center, Montreal; and Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  6. Division of Rheumatology, Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
  7. Scleroderma Foundation, USA.
  8. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Texas McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX, USA.
  9. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Texas McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX, USA.
  10. Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
  11. Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
  12. Toronto Scleroderma Program, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Toronto Western and Mount Sinai Hospitals, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  13. Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal; and Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  14. Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.
  15. San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, USA.
  16. San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, USA.
  17. San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, USA.
  18. Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  19. Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal; and Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  20. Lady Davis Inst.Med.Res, Jewish Gen.Hosp; Depts. Educational & Counselling Psychology, Psychiatry, McGill Univ; Dept.of Medicine, McGill Univ; Depts. Psychology, Epidemiology, Biostats & Occupational Health, School Nursing, McGill Univ, Montreal, Canada.

and the SPIN Investigators

CER9519
2016 Vol.34, N°5 ,Suppl.100
PI 0092, PF 0099
Clinical aspects

purchase article

PMID: 27494308 [PubMed]

Received: 20/04/2016
Accepted : 04/07/2016
In Press: 01/08/2016
Published: 14/10/2016

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Appearance concerns are common in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and have been linked to younger age and more severe disease. No study has examined their association with sex or race/ethnicity.
METHODS:
SSc patients were sampled from the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network Cohort. Presence of appearance concerns was assessed with a single item, and medical and sociodemographic information were collected.
RESULTS:
Of 644 patients, appearance concerns were present in 72%, including 421 of 565 women (75%), 42 of 79 men (53%), 392 of 550 patients who identified as White (71%), 35 of 41 who identified as Black (85%), and 36 of 53 who identified as another race/ethnicity (68%). In multivariate analysis, women had significantly greater odds of reporting appearance concerns than men (odds ratio (OR)=2.97, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.78-4.95, p<.001). Black patients had significantly greater odds of appearance concerns than White patients in unadjusted (OR=2.64, 95% CI=1.01-6.34, p=.030), but not multivariate analysis (OR=1.76, 95% CI=0.67-4.60, p=.250). Compared to a general population sample, appearance concerns were substantially more common in SSc, particularly for men across all age groups and for younger women. The most commonly reported features of concern were related to the face and head, followed by the hands and fingers; this did not differ by sex or race/ethnicity.
CONCLUSIONS:
Appearance concerns were common in SSc. Women were substantially more likely than men to have appearance concerns. Although non-significant in multivariate analysis, Black patients were more likely to have concerns than White patients, likely due to more severe changes in appearance.

Rheumatology Article