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Clinical aspects

 

An unrecognised presentation of Takayasu arteritis: superficial femoral artery involvement


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 

  1. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
  2. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
  3. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. jxj103@hotmail.com
  4. Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.
  5. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
  6. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
  7. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
  8. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
  9. Department of Cardiology, Fuwai Hospital, National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

CER9922
2017 Vol.35, N°1 ,Suppl.103
PI 0083, PF 0087
Clinical aspects

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PMID: 27908309 [PubMed]

Received: 12/09/2016
Accepted : 17/10/2016
In Press: 18/11/2016
Published: 19/04/2017

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Superficial femoral artery (SFA) involvement in Takayasu arteritis (TAK) has rarely been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristic and clinical outcomes of endovascular therapy in such patients.
METHODS:
We analysed the data collected from 105 consecutive patients with TAK, who were diagnosed from January 2011 to December 2013. All patients underwent ankle brachial index (ABI) measurements and angiography. Nine patients with an ABI <0.9 and SFA stenosis (≥50%) were detected. Of them, 5 patients underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in SFA lesions. The clinical features, angiographic findings, treatment, and follow-up outcomes were investigated retrospectively.
RESULTS:
Thirteen SFA stenosis in 8.6% patients (9/105) was found. The mean age was 44.3±15.7 years (all female) and mean Rutherford stage was 2.1±0.6. Compared with that at baseline, the ABI (0.98±0.03 vs. 0.66±0.09, p=0.001) and 6-min walking capacity (361±47 vs. 224±44 m, p<0.001) after PTA had improved significantly. During a mean follow-up of 27.4±10.6 months, the changes of ABI (0.29±0.06 vs. -0.04±-0.04, p<0.001) differed significantly between SFA lesions that had undergone PTA and those without PTA. Restenosis was found in one SFA lesion 23 months after PTA. No severe adverse events occurred in 5 patients who underwent PTA during the perioperative period and follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS:
SFA involvement in TAK is not rare. PTA is a safe and feasible way to improve SFA ischaemia.

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