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Paediatric Rheumatology

 

Childhood primary large vessel CNS vasculitis: single-centre experience and review of the literature


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 

  1. Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  2. Klinik- und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  3. Institut und Poliklinik für Radiologische Diagnostik, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  4. Klinik- und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  5. Klinik- und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  6. Klinik- und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  7. Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  8. Abteilung Neuropädiatrie, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  9. Klinik- und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany. christian.hedrich@uniklinikum-dresden.de

CER10067
2017 Vol.35, N°1 ,Suppl.103
PI 0213, PF 0220
Paediatric Rheumatology

purchase article

PMID: 28375836 [PubMed]

Received: 03/11/2016
Accepted : 18/01/2017
In Press: 28/03/2017
Published: 20/04/2017

Abstract

Ischaemic brain injuries are rare conditions in the paediatric age group. Main causes include non-arteriosclerotic arteriopathies, which in childhood usually result from primary vasculitis of large or small vessels and lead to impaired perfusion and subsequent ischaemic brain lesions. In accordance with the nomenclature of systemic forms, CNS vasculitis is subdivided into groups, based on the size of affected vessels: angiography-positive primary angiitis of medium-sized and large vessels (pPACNS), and angiography-negative angiitis of small vessels (svPACNS). We report the clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and therapy of four children with progressive pPACNS. Patients were treated with high-dose corticosteroids and anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin in the acute phase, followed by immune modulatory treatment with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. In this manuscript, we illustrate the experience gained in our hospital, resulting in significantly faster diagnosis and treatment initiation, and discuss the applied immune modulating treatment regimen in the context of the literature. Based on our observations, we conclude that immune modulating therapy with initial high-dose corticosteroids, followed by steroid-sparing maintenance treatment with MMF, may be safe and effective in childhood progressive pPACNS.

Rheumatology Article