impact factor
logo
 

Full Papers

 

Rheumatoid arthritis patients achieved better quality of life than systemic lupus erythematosus patients at sustained remission


1, 2, 3, 4

 

  1. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico. virtichu@gmail.com
  2. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  3. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  4. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.

CER10700
2018 Vol.36, N°4
PI 0619, PF 0626
Full Papers

Free to view
(click on article PDF icon to read the article)

PMID: 29600935 [PubMed]

Received: 21/07/2017
Accepted : 11/12/2017
In Press: 21/03/2018
Published: 19/07/2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
In 2004 and 1999, respectively, recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) cohorts were initiated; the 36 item Medical Outcome Study Short-Form survey (SF-36) was applied beginning from enrolment. The objectives were to compare the SF-36v2 scores between patients from both cohorts who achieved sustained remission and to define the role of disease diagnosis as associated to SF-36v2 normative data in remission patients.
METHODS:
Sustained remission was considered when RA and SLE patients achieved at least 12 months of continuous follow-up with either SLE disease activity index 2000 update =0 or Disease Activity Score (28 joints) ≤2.4, respectively. Up to December 2015, data from 172 RA patients and 211 SLE patients were reviewed. SF-36v2 scores were available for the totality of remission assessments. Logistic regression models were used to investigate factors associated with normative SF-36v2. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients.
RESULTS:
A higher proportion of patients achieved sustained remission sooner in the RA cohort than in the SLE cohort, 58% vs. 30.6% of the patients, after 30.8±23.9 vs. 59.4±37.5 months, respectively, p≤0.001. At sustained remission, RA patients scored better than SLE patients in 6 out of 8 domains of the SF-36v2 and the physical health component summary (PHCS); the opposite figure was true for the mental component. Age (ß: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.1, p=0.03) and SLE diagnosis (ß: 9.64, 95% CI: 3.61-25.75, p≤0.001) were predictors of not achieving normative PHCS.
CONCLUSIONS:
RA patients in sustained remission achieved better quality of life than SLE patients.

Rheumatology Article