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Comparing the clinical profile of adults and children with Behçet’s syndrome in the UK

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

  1. UCLH Department of Rheumatology, University College London Hospital, London, UK.
  2. UCLH Department of Rheumatology, University College London Hospital, London, UK. sam.myers1@nhs.net
  3. Arthritis Research UK Centre for Adolescent Rheumatology, University College London, Rayne Institute, London, UK.
  4. Vascular Sciences Section, National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.
  5. Infection, Inflammation and Rheumatology Section, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
  6. UCLH Dept.Rheumatology, Univ.College London Hosp.; Arthritis Research UK Centre for Adolescent Rheumatology, Univ.College London, Rayne Inst.; Vascular Sciences Section, National Heart & Lung Inst., Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hosp., London, UK.

CER11708 Submission on line
Full Papers

Rheumatology Article

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Behçet’s syndrome (BS) is a rare multi-system inflammatory disorder. Clinical phenotypic variance across geographical regions is recognised but UK BS patients’ variance by age groups and gender has not been studied. This study compares the clinical features of adult and juvenile onset Behçet’s Syndrome (JBS) in a UK population.
METHODS:
Two clinical databases of BS patients were compared. The JBS database was collected at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (n=46). The adult database was collected at the Hammersmith Hospital, London (n=560).
RESULTS:
Oro-genital aphthosis had high prevalence in both the JBS and the adult cohort (oral: 97.8% vs. 96.6%, genital: 73.9% vs. 75.7%). The JBS cohort was more likely to have gastrointestinal involvement (21.7% vs. 4.5%, p<0.001) and arthritis (21.7% vs. 9.6%, p=0.021) compared to adults. The JBS cohort was less likely to have eye involvement (4.3% vs. 37%, p<0.001), skin (21.7% vs. 55.4%, p<0.001) and vascular involvement (6.5% vs. 17.5% p=0.063). JBS females had a higher rate of genital aphthosis than JBS males (87.5% vs. 59.1%, p=0.044). Adult females had higher rates of genital (85.2% vs. 64.5%, p<0.001) and oral (99.0% vs. 93.8%, p=0.001) aphthosis than adult males. Adult males were more likely to have ophthalmological (44.9% vs. 30.3%, p<0.001) and vascular (23.0% vs. 12.8%, p=0.002) manifestations than adult females.
CONCLUSIONS:
UK JBS patients displayed less ocular and skin manifestations compared to the adult BS patients. This information will aid clinicians in diagnosing BS in UK adult and paediatric populations.

PMID: 31172922 [PubMed]

Received: 05/09/2018 - Accepted : 20/03/2019 - In Press: 30/05/2019