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Serum IgG4 elevation in SAPHO syndrome: does it unmask a disease activity marker?

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

  1. Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  2. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  3. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  4. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  5. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  6. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  7. Dept.Orthopaedic Surgery, Peking Union Med.College Hosp., Peking Union Med.College & Chinese Academy of Med. Sciences, Beijing; Med. Res. Ctr of Orthopaedics, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences; Beijing Key Lab. Genetic Res.Skeletal Deformity, China.
  8. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. zhangwen91@sina.com

CER11935 Submission on line
Full Papers

Rheumatology Article

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
SAPHO syndrome is a rare inflammatory disorder with multiple phenotypes, including synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis. IgG4 is a subclass of immunoglobulin G, and the elevation of IgG4 has been found in different autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we explored the clinical significance of serum IgG4 levels in patients with SAPHO syndrome.
METHODS:
Fifty-two patients who met the classification criteria of SAPHO syndrome were included in this study. Clinical data and disease activity markers were collected including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), pain visual analogue scale (VAS), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS). Serum immunoglobin (IgA, IgM, and IgG) and IgG subclass (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) levels were determined using the immunonephelometric assay.
RESULTS:
Raised serum IgG4 levels (>1400 mg/dL) were detected in 23% (12/52) of patients. Patients with elevated sIgG4 levels had significantly higher pain VAS (5.42±2.76 vs. 3.08±1.78, p=0.02), BASMI (1.80±1.64 vs. 0.38±0.94, p=0.03) and ASDAS (3.20±0.65 vs. 1.74±0.58, p<0.001) levels compared with patients with normal sIgG4 levels. This difference was also observed for ESR (38.2 vs. 22.2 mm/h, p=0.01) and serum CRP (21.0 vs. 2.2 mg/L, p=0.04) levels, which also positively correlated with sIgG4 levels. We also included 4 patients whose IgG4 levels decreased and correlated with the decrease in hsCRP and ESR levels after treatment.
CONCLUSIONS:
Elevated sIgG4 levels are common in patients with SAPHO syndrome and are associated with high disease activity. Further investigations are needed for this phenomenon.

PMID: 31025928 [PubMed]

Received: 25/11/2018 - Accepted : 04/03/2019 - In Press: 16/04/2019