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Large-vessel vasculitis

 

Takayasu's arteritis: associated inflammatory diseases


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

 

  1. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  2. Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  3. Department of Ophthalmology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  4. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  5. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  6. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  7. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
  8. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey. eseyahi@yahoo.com

CER12695
2020 Vol.38, N°2 ,Suppl.124
PI 0061, PF 0068
Large-vessel vasculitis

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PMID: 31969224 [PubMed]

Received: 21/08/2019
Accepted : 25/10/2019
In Press: 14/01/2020
Published: 21/05/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Case reports and series suggest that Takayasu’s arteritis (TAK) can co-exist with other inflammatory disorders. We conducted a formal study to look specifically at the frequency of such inflammatory disorders in a large cohort of TAK followed by a single tertiary centre.
METHODS:
There were 238 patients registered with a diagnosis of TAK. Of these, 19 died, 18 were lost to follow-up and 3 did not wish to respond to our questionnaire. The remaining 198 (175 F/23 M) patients were called back at the outpatient clinic. A standardised form sought whether the patient was also diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), Behçet’s syndrome (BS), autoimmune or any other inflammatory disorder. The presence of skin-mucosa lesions, inflammatory eye disease and inflammatory back pain were also specifically sought for.
RESULTS:
We identified 37 (19%) patients with inflammatory bowel disease (n=12, 6%), ankylosing spondylitis (n=15, 8%) or Behçet’s syndrome (n=10, 5%). Thirteen (6.5%) patients had systemic or localised autoimmune disease and 9 (4.5%) miscellaneous inflammatory diseases. Among the 139 patients without any concomitant disease, inflammatory back pain (n=49, 35%) was the most common feature, followed by recurrent oral ulcer (n=20, 14%) erythema nodosum (n=17, 12%), arthritis (n=12, 9%) papulopustular lesions (n=8, 6%) and uveitis/scleritis (n=6, 4%). Only 64 patients (32%) did not have any concomitant disease/condition or specific clinical feature.
CONCLUSIONS:
TAK does co-occur with IBD, AS and less frequently with BS in about 1/5 of the patients, at least in a hospital setting. There is no clear temporal pattern. The high prevalence of inflammatory back pain in the dorsal spine in TAK needs further scrutiny.

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