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Large-vessel vasculitis

 

Natural killer cells and their function in Takayasu's arteritis


1, 2, 3, 4, 5

 

  1. Department of Rheumatology, Capital Medical University Affiliated Anzhen Hospital, Beijing, China.
  2. Department of Rheumatology, Capital Medical University Affiliated Anzhen Hospital, Beijing, China.
  3. Department of Rheumatology, Capital Medical University Affiliated Anzhen Hospital, Beijing, and Beijing Institute of Heart, Lung and Vessel Disease, China.
  4. Department of Rheumatology, Capital Medical University Affiliated Anzhen Hospital, Beijing, and Beijing Institute of Heart, Lung and Vessel Disease, China.
  5. Department of Rheumatology, Capital Medical University Affiliated Anzhen Hospital, Beijing, China. lilypansxmu@sina.com

CER12856
2020 Vol.38, N°2 ,Suppl.124
PI 0084, PF 0090
Large-vessel vasculitis

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PMID: 32167875 [PubMed]

Received: 10/10/2019
Accepted : 17/02/2020
In Press: 13/03/2020
Published: 21/05/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Takayasu’s arteritis (TAK) is a chronic, large vessel systemic vasculitis. Immune inflammatory response plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of TAK. Natural killer (NK) cells are one of the major immunoregulatory cell groups of the immune system, but their role in TAK pathogenesis is unclear. We aimed to investigate the role of peripheral blood NK cells in TAK pathogenesis.
METHODS:
The study consisted of 47 TAK patients and 27 healthy controls. Peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells and their CD56Dim/CD56Bright subsets were phenotyped using CD3 and CD56 surface markers. Functional potential was assessed by production of granzyme B, perforin and interferon (IFN)-γ.
RESULTS:
TAK patients had decreased numbers of NK cells in the peripheral blood (p<0.001) relative to healthy controls. The percentages of CD56Bright (p<0.05) and CD56Dim NK cells (p<0.001) from TAK patients were also decreased. The expressions of Granzyme B (p<0.001), Perforin (p<0.001) in NK cells were lower in TAK patients to compared control group, but no differences in the percentage of IFN-γ producing cells was observed between TAK patients and healthy control. There is no difference in the percentage of NK cells or CD56Bright or CD56Dim NK cells between active and inactive TAK. However, granzyme B-expressing NK cell percentage was significantly decreased in active TAK compared to inactive TAK (p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS:
Our findings concluded that NK cell numbers and cytotoxicity are reduced in TAK patients.

Rheumatology Article