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Clinical aspects

 

10-year follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren’s syndrome or sicca symptoms in daily clinical practice


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

 

  1. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
  2. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
  3. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
  4. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
  5. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
  6. Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, The Netherlands. h.bootsma@umcg.nl

CER13349
2020 Vol.38, N°4 ,Suppl.126
PI 0064, PF 0072
Clinical aspects

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PMID: 33025888 [PubMed]

Received: 21/03/2020
Accepted : 13/07/2020
In Press: 23/09/2020
Published: 22/10/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate the presence of sicca symptoms and secondary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) and the association with clinical characteristics, functional tests and patient-reported outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at baseline and after 10 years of follow-up.
METHODS:
A cohort of RA patients was evaluated in 2008 and re-evaluated in 2018 with respect to sicca symptoms, presence of secondary SS according to AECG classification criteria, disease activity of RA and patient-reported outcomes. Patient characteristics were compared between the RA-non-sicca, RA-sicca and RA-SS groups.
RESULTS:
Of the original 2008 cohort of 96 RA patients, 32 (33%) had sicca symptoms and 6 (6.3%) secondary SS. Of the 36 patients who agreed to be re-evaluated in 2018, 6 (17%) had sicca symptoms and 2 (6%) developed secondary SS. In the majority of patients, sicca symptoms were reversible while the functional tests of salivary and lacrimal glands significantly decreased. 67% of RA-sicca patients had no sicca complaints at the second screening, while only two RA-sicca patients developed secondary SS. RA-SS patients and, to a slightly lesser extent, RA-sicca patients had significantly higher RA disease activity (DAS-28), lower lacrimal (Schirmer’s test) and salivary gland function, more limitations in daily activities (HAQ), worse health-related quality of life (RAND-36), more fatigue (MFI) and more patient symptoms (ESSPRI) compared to RA-non-sicca patients.
CONCLUSIONS:
Secondary SS was found in a minor subset of the RA patients. Sicca symptoms of the eyes or mouth were more frequent, but their presence varied over time. Higher RA disease activity was associated with SS and sicca symptoms. These patients had lower gland function and worse patient-reported outcomes.

Rheumatology Article