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Aetiopathogenesis

 

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in primary Sjögren’s syndrome: clinical meaning and association with inflammation


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

 

  1. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  2. Department of Physiology of Nutrition, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  3. Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and the Research Unit of Metabolic Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  4. Ophtalmologic Service, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  5. Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and the Research Unit of Metabolic Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  6. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  7. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  8. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  9. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
  10. Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico. gabyhm@yahoo.com

CER13462
2020 Vol.38, N°4 ,Suppl.126
PI 0034, PF 0039
Aetiopathogenesis

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PMID: 32896265 [PubMed]

Received: 16/04/2020
Accepted : 20/07/2020
In Press: 03/09/2020
Published: 22/10/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Lipid mediators derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA), have been related to inflammation and immune response regulation. Herein we evaluated the intake and serum levels of ω-3 and ω-6 FA among patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), and correlated with ocular/oral sicca symptoms, disease activity and a panel of chemokines/cytokines.
METHODS:
We included 108 patients and 100 controls. Dietary information was obtained from a food questionnaire of one-day reminder and processed using a nutritional software. Among the SS group, we measured serum ω-3 (α-linolenic acid [α-LN], eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and ω-6 (linoleic acid [LA], arachidonic acid [AA]) by gas chromatography flame ionization. We scored the ESSDAI, ESPRI, Schirmer-I test and NSWSF. In a subsample, we assessed the OSDI, ophthalmologic staining scores and measured CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL2, IL-22 and IL-21 in saliva, and CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL9 in tears by Luminometry.
RESULTS:
ω-3 and ω-6 intake was lower in SS patients than controls, and did not correlate with serum levels. We found a negative correlation between α-LN and the OSDI and ESSDAI, as well as DHA and ESSDAI. In tears, AA positively correlated with CXCL9, whereas in saliva, α-LN, DHA and the ω3 sum negatively correlated with CCL2. We observed a negative correlation between the ω6 sum and IL-21.
CONCLUSIONS:
pSS patients had deficient omega intake. Lower ocular symptoms, ESSDAI scores and salivary CCL2 correlated with higher ω-3 levels, possible suggesting a role in chronic inflammation. Further studies are warranted to deepen in the knowledge of this association.

Rheumatology Article