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Impact of a pharmacist-led programme on biologics knowledge and adherence in patients with spondyloarthritis


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 

  1. Department of Pharmacy, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, France. gutermann.loriane@gmail.com
  2. Department of Pharmacy, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, France.
  3. Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris; INSERM (U1153), Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France.
  4. Department of Pharmacy, Hôpital Sud-francillien, Corbeil-Essones, France.
  5. Department of Pharmacy, Hôpital Necker Enfants-Malades, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, France.
  6. Department of Risk and Quality Management, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, France.
  7. Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris; INSERM (U1153), Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France.
  8. Department of Pharmacy, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, France.
  9. Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris; INSERM (U1153), Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France.

CER13493
Full Papers

purchase article

PMID: 33124563 [PubMed]

Received: 25/04/2020
Accepted : 01/07/2020
In Press: 09/10/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
In spondyloarthritis (SpA), improving patients’ knowledge on their biologics is a key factor to enhance adherence. The information given to the patient has to ensure the acquisition of safety skills regarding their treatment. The aims of this trial were to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist’s educational interview on knowledge and adherence to biologics in these patients.
METHODS:
Consecutive adult patients with well-controlled axial SpA, stable on biologics were enrolled in a randomised, controlled, single-centre, open-label, 6-month trial. A pharmacist’s educational interview provided information on biologics management at baseline in the intervention group and at month 6 in the control group. The changes in a weighted knowledge score concerning the management of biologics and the change in the Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) at month-6 were primary outcomes. The changes in disease activity (BASDAI) and patients’ satisfaction regarding the pharmacists’ interview were secondary outcomes.
RESULTS:
Patients’ characteristics at baseline were comparable among the 89 included patients (46 in the intervention group, 43 in the control group). The patient’s knowledge score concerning biologics management improved at a greater magnitude in the educational group (+11.0±11.5 vs. +3.0 ±10.6 in the intervention versus the control group, respectively, p<0.0001). There was also a trend in a better adherence (+2.2±13.9 vs. -0.6±18.9 in the intervention versus the control group, respectively, p=0.691). The disease activity remained stable in both groups.
CONCLUSIONS:
This study is strongly in favour of the benefit of a pharmacist’s educational interview in the management of patients with axial SpA.

Rheumatology Article