impact factor
logo
 

Clinical aspects

 

Significance of anti-La/SSB antibodies in primary Sjögren’s syndrome patients with combined positivity for anti-Ro/SSA and salivary gland biopsy


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

 

  1. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  2. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  3. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy.
  4. Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Rheumatology Clinic, University of Udine, Italy.
  5. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
  6. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Science, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  7. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy.
  8. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
  9. Internal Medicine, Endocrine and Metabolic Science Section, University of Perugia, Italy.
  10. Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Rheumatology Clinic, University of Udine, Italy.
  11. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Science, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  12. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy. roberto.gerli@unipg.it
  13. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.

for the Italian Research Group on Sjögren’s syndrome (GRISS)

CER13704
2020 Vol.38, N°4 ,Suppl.126
PI 0053, PF 0056
Clinical aspects

Free to view
(click on article PDF icon to read the article)

PMID: 33095137 [PubMed]

Received: 16/06/2020
Accepted : 07/07/2020
In Press: 22/10/2020
Published: 22/10/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Immunological parameters exert a relevant diagnostic and prognostic role in primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) and may identify specific disease phenotypes. Among disease-associated immunological features, anti-La/SSB are rarely found without concomitant anti-Ro/SSA and their clinical significance in patients with pSS has been poorly investigated. Thus, we aimed to characterise the value of anti-La/SSB analysing clinical and serologic features of a wide cohort of pSS patients with both circulating anti-Ro/SSA and positive salivary gland biopsy (SGB).
METHODS:
Clinical and serological data of 600 pSS patients with both anti-Ro/SSA and SGB positivity and categorised according to anti-La/SSB status were retrospectively analysed. Comparisons between patients with and without circulating anti-La/SSB were performed.
RESULTS:
Among the whole cohort, 319 (53%) of patients were anti-La/SSB negative and 281 (47%) were anti-La/SSB positive. Anti-La/SSB positive patients were younger at disease diagnosis and had a longer disease duration. Moreover, anti-La/SSB positive patients had a higher prevalence of hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating rheumatoid factor and of lymphoproliferative disorders in comparison to seronegative group. At multivariate analysis, hypergammaglobulinaemia (OR=1,7; 95% CI 1.17, 2.43), rheumatoid factor (OR=2.3; 95% CI 1.6, 3.3) and lymphoma (OR=2.6; 95% CI 1.12, 5.96) were identified as independent variables significantly associated with anti-La/SSB positivity.
CONCLUSIONS:
In patients with pSS and concomitant anti-Ro/SSA and SGB positivity, the presence of anti-La/SSB may help in identifying a disease subset with distinct prognostic features, especially in terms of higher risk of lymphoproliferative complications.

Rheumatology Article