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The global antiphospholipid syndrome score in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and adverse pregnancy outcomes


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

 

  1. Danish Hospital for Rheumatic diseases, Sønderborg; Danish Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, and Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
  2. Center of Research of Immunopathology and Rare Diseases - Coordinating Center of Piemonte and Valle d’Aosta Network for Rare Diseases, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, and SCDU Nephrology and Dialysis, S. Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Turin, Italy.
  3. Center of Research of Immunopathology and Rare Diseases - Coordinating Center of Piemonte and Valle d’Aosta Network for Rare Diseases, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, and SCDU Nephrology and Dialysis, S. Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Turin, Italy.
  4. Center of Research of Immunopathology and Rare Diseases - Coordinating Center of Piemonte and Valle d’Aosta Network for Rare Diseases, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, and SCDU Nephrology and Dialysis, S. Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Turin, Italy.
  5. Center of Research of Immunopathology and Rare Diseases - Coordinating Center of Piemonte and Valle d’Aosta Network for Rare Diseases, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, and SCDU Nephrology and Dialysis, S. Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Turin, Italy.
  6. Copenhagen Lupus and Vasculitis Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  7. Rheumatology Department, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Madrid, Spain.
  8. Center of Research of Immunopathology and Rare Diseases - Coordinating Center of Piemonte and Valle d’Aosta Network for Rare Diseases, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, and SCDU Nephrology and Dialysis, S. Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Turin, Italy. savino.sciascia@unito.it

CER13730
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PMID: 33200742 [PubMed]

Received: 25/06/2020
Accepted : 14/09/2020
In Press: 12/11/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To validate the global antiphospholipid syndrome score (GAPSS) in a cohort of women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL).
METHODS:
This retrospective study included 143 women ever pregnant with SLE who presented in our outpatient clinic were included. Data on cardiovascular risk factors and aPL status were retrospectively collected and their individual GAPSS score was calculated.
RESULTS:
Significantly higher GAPSS values were found in women with any placental medicated complication (such as foetal death, placental abruption, prematurity, pre-eclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)) (GAPSS 8.2±3.0 vs. 3.5±3.0, p<0.001). Significantly higher GAPSS values were also found in those with recurrent miscarriages (RM) <10 weeks, foetal death, placental abruption, prematurity, pre-eclampsia or IUGR) (GAPSS 8.3±4.5 vs. 3.2±2.6, p<0.001). Patients with 3 or more consecutive early miscarriages (<10 weeks), foetal death, miscarriage <10 weeks’ gestation, premature birth (<34 weeks), pre-eclampsia (<34 weeks), stillbirth, and placental infarction had significantly higher GAPSS values compared to those without previous pregnancy complications. The odds ratio of having any pregnancy morbidity when having a GAPSS value ≥8 was 20 compared to those with a GAPSS of ≤1 (p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS:
Women with a history of aPL-related pregnancy complications had higher GAPSS values in this retrospective cohort compared to women without pregnancy complications. This study is the first step to assess the clinical utility of the GAPSS score in pregnancy. A prospective validation is needed.

Rheumatology Article