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Characterisation of articular manifestations in primary Sjögren’s syndrome: clinical and imaging features


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

 

  1. Department of Medicine, ASL1 Avezzano-Sulmona-L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy. francescocarubbi@libero.it
  2. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  3. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Science, School of Medicine, University of L’Aquila, Italy.
  4. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  5. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Science, School of Medicine, University of L’Aquila, Italy.
  6. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  7. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.

CER13749
2020 Vol.38, N°4 ,Suppl.126
PI 0166, PF 0173
Diagnosis

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PMID: 33025895 [PubMed]

Received: 29/06/2020
Accepted : 20/07/2020
In Press: 22/09/2020
Published: 23/10/2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Articular manifestations (AMs) are observed in a large proportion of patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) and can occur at the time of pSS diagnosis or during the disease course. Although in the majority of cases AMs are mild and self-limiting, some patients may experience chronic polyarthritis requiring treatment with DMARDs. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can help assessing the extent of articular involvement and guide the treatment. The aim of this study was to describe clinical, serological, and histological picture of a cohort of pSS patients with AMs.
METHODS:
Clinical and serological records were retrospectively evaluated and either US or MRI were performed to evaluate AMs and their features were described according to the OMERACT scoring systems.
RESULTS:
One hundred and thirty-three pSS patients were enrolled, of whom 115 (86%) with articular involvement. In particular, 91 patients (68%) displayed AMs at the time of pSS diagnosis while 24 patients (32%) during the course of the disease. Patients with AMs during the disease course were diagnosed with pSS at a younger age and reported a higher VAS dryness compared to patients displaying AMs at pSS onset. Hands and wrists were the most frequently involved sites followed by knees, shoulders and ankles. Overall, a consistent number of abnormalities were detected, more by MRI than US. Hands and wrists were the most frequently evaluated sites and the prevalence of all MRI abnormalities was similar between the different sites and comparable between the groups.
CONCLUSIONS:
pSS AMs encompass a wide disease spectrum ranging from arthralgia to erosive arthritis resembling RA and therefore represent an important determinant of patients’ quality of life. Imaging techniques such as US and MRI may be useful in the follow-up of pSS patients for prompt identification of AMs, for the quantification of their extent and ultimately for providing guidance on treatment and improving patient care.

Rheumatology Article