impact factor
logo
 

Diagnosis

 

D-dimer predicts poor hospitalisation outcomes in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

 

  1. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  2. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  3. Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
  4. Kaiser Permanente-Hawaii Internal Medicine Residency Program, Honolulu, HI, USA.
  5. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  6. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  7. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  8. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, and Severance Institute for Vascular and Metabolic Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. jsksong@yuhs.ac

CER13791
2021 Vol.39, N°2 ,Suppl.129
PI 0094, PF 0100
Diagnosis

Free to view
(click on article PDF icon to read the article)

PMID: 33635209 [PubMed]

Received: 09/07/2020
Accepted : 30/11/2020
In Press: 25/02/2021
Published: 19/05/2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
The in-hospital mortality rate among patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) is high. Unfortunately, there is no reliable prognostic biomarker. This study aimed to investigate whether elevated D-dimer levels can predict hospitalisation outcomes among patients with AAV.
METHODS:
We performed a retrospective analysis at a tertiary medical centre in Seoul, South Korea, between 2005 and 2019. Patients with AAV requiring hospitalisation, whose D-dimer levels were available within one week of hospitalisation, were included; patients with known alternative reasons for elevated D-dimer were excluded. Death and intensive care unit requirements were defined as adverse outcomes.
RESULTS:
In total, 61 AAV patients with a total of 100 episodes of hospitalisation were included. Median D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with adverse outcomes than in those without adverse outcomes (1.84 vs. 0.42 mg/dL; p=0.006). Consistently, the incidence of the adverse outcomes was significantly higher in the high D-dimer group (≥0.699 mg/dL; n = 40) than in the low D-dimer group (<0.699 mg/dL; n = 60) (35% vs. 10%; p=0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a high D-dimer level was a significant risk factor for adverse outcomes (hazard ratio, 4.852; 95% confidence interval, 1.320-17.833; p=0.017). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that the high D-dimer group was associated with more 30-day in-hospital adverse outcomes than the low D-dimer group (p=0.008).
CONCLUSIONS:
High D-dimer levels on admission are significantly associated with adverse outcomes among patients with AAV.

Rheumatology Article

Rheumatology Addendum