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Role of adiponectin in non-diabetic patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing anti-IL-6 therapy


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

 

  1. Research Group on Genetic Epidemiology and Atherosclerosis in Systemic Diseases and in Metabolic Bone Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System, IDIVAL, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.
  2. Research Group on Genetic Epidemiology and Atherosclerosis in Systemic Diseases and in Metabolic Bone Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System, IDIVAL, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.
  3. Research Group on Genetic Epidemiology and Atherosclerosis in Systemic Diseases and in Metabolic Bone Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System, IDIVAL, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.
  4. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Txagorritxu, Vitoria, Araba, University of Basque Country, Araba, Spain.
  5. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Sierrallana, Torrelavega, Cantabria, Spain.
  6. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, IIS-Princesa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Madrid, Spain.
  7. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, IIS-Princesa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Madrid, Spain.
  8. Research Group on Genetic Epidemiology and Atherosclerosis in Systemic Diseases and in Metabolic Bone Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System, IDIVAL, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.
  9. Epidemiology and Computational Biology Department, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria, and CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Santander, Spain.
  10. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Basurto, Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain.
  11. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Basurto, Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain.
  12. SERGAS (Servizo Galego de Saude) and IDIS (Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago), NEIRID Lab (Neuroendocrine Interactions in Rheumatology and Inflammatory Diseases), Research Laboratory 9, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.
  13. Research Group on Genetic Epidemiology and Atherosclerosis in Systemic Diseases and in Metabolic Bone Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System, IDIVAL, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.
  14. Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, IIS-Princesa, Cátedra UAM-ROCHE, EPID Future, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Madrid, Spain.
  15. Research Group on Genetic Epidemiology and Atherosclerosis in Systemic Diseases and in Metabolic Bone Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System, IDIVAL, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla; School of Medicine, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain. miguelaggay@hotmail.com

CER14621
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PMID: 34251326 [PubMed]

Received: 11/03/2021
Accepted : 03/05/2021
In Press: 07/07/2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Adiponectin is an adipokine that plays a relevant role in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), a complication that increases the risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accordingly, we assessed for the first time the short-term effect of anti-IL-6 receptor tocilizumab (TCZ) administration on adiponectin serum levels in RA patients and explored the potential association of adiponectin levels with MetS features, other CV risk factors and demographic and clinical characteristics of these patients.
METHODS:
Adiponectin serum levels were evaluated in 50 non-diabetic RA patients, undergoing TCZ treatment, immediately prior to (pre-infusion) and 60 minutes after the end of a TCZ intravenous infusion (post-infusion).
RESULTS:
No significant differences in adiponectin levels pre- and post-TCZ infusion were found in RA patients (p=0.69). Patients with obesity exhibited decreased basal levels of adiponectin with respect to those non-obese (p=0.03). Additionally, a negative association of adiponectin basal levels with body mass index, insulin, insulin/glucose index, C-peptide and leptin levels (p<0.01; p=0.02; p=0.03; p=0.03 and p=0.01, respectively), as well as a positive correlation with HDL-cholesterol levels (p<0.001) was seen.
CONCLUSIONS:
Our results support the claim that low adiponectin may contribute to the development of MetS and, consequently, CV disease in RA. Anti-IL-6 therapy does not seem to exert a short-term effect on adiponectin levels.

Rheumatology Article