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Fibromyalgia severity according to age categories: results of a cross-sectional study from a large national database


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37

 

  1. Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy. dica.marco@yahoo.it
  2. Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy.
  3. Rheumatology Unit, AOU Pisana, Pisa, Italy.
  4. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Messina, Italy.
  5. Rheumatology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara and Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria S. Anna di Ferrara, Italy.
  6. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, Italy.
  7. Department of Internal Medicine, Anesthesiological and Cardiovascular Sciences, Rheumatology Unit, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
  8. Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy.
  9. Rheumatology Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
  10. Unit of Immunology, Rheumatology, Allergy and Rare Diseases (UnIRAR), IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.
  11. Rheumatology Unit, Internal Medicine Department, ASST Settelaghi, Ospedale Di Circolo, Fondazione Macchi, Varese, Italy.
  12. Unit of Rheumatology, ASUGI and Clinical University Department of Medical, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Italy.
  13. University of Rome "Campus Biomedico", School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Roma, Italy.
  14. Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Divisions of Rheumatology AOUC, University of Florence, Italy.
  15. Department of Health Promotion Sciences, Maternal and Infant Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Palermo, Italy.
  16. Integrated Reference Centre of Rheumatology, ASP 7, Scicli Hospital, Ragusa, Italy.
  17. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Italy.
  18. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Italy.
  19. Rheumatology Unit, S. Maria Hospital, USL, IRCCS Institute, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
  20. Rheumatology Unit, Azienda USL di Modena, Italy.
  21. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantations, University of Bari, Italy.
  22. Rheumatology Unit, Internal Medicine Department, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan University School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
  23. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Messina, Italy.
  24. Rheumatology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara and Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria S. Anna di Ferrara, Italy.
  25. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, Italy.
  26. Department of Internal Medicine, Anesthesiological and Cardiovascular Sciences, Rheumatology Unit, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
  27. Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy.
  28. Rheumatology Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
  29. Unit of Immunology, Rheumatology, Allergy and Rare Diseases (UnIRAR), IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.
  30. Rheumatology Unit, Internal Medicine Department, ASST Settelaghi, Ospedale Di Circolo, Fondazione Macchi, Varese, Italy.
  31. Clinical Unit of Rheumatology, School of Medicine, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  32. Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Divisions of Rheumatology AOUC, University of Florence, Italy.
  33. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Italy.
  34. Research Laboratory and Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, IRCCS San Martino, Genova, Italy.
  35. Division of Rheumatology, ASST Gaetano Pini-CTO, Milano, Italy
  36. Rheumatology Unit, Internal Medicine Department, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan University School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
  37. Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy.

CER14900
2022 Vol.40, N°6
PI 1084, PF 1090
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PMID: 35383567 [PubMed]

Received: 16/06/2021
Accepted : 20/09/2021
In Press: 30/03/2022
Published: 22/06/2022

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
The role of age in influencing the severity of fibromyalgia (FM) is still controversial. The aim of this study is to define the contribution of age in the severity of FM from data from a large national database.
METHODS:
This cross-sectional study included adult patients with FM diagnosed according to the 2010/2011 American College of Rheumatology criteria. Disease severity was assessed with the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and the modified Fibromyalgia Assessment Status (FAS 2019mod). Patients were grouped into five age categories (between 18-40 years, between 41-50 years, between 51-60 years, between 61-70 years, and ≥71 years). Differences in disease severity between groups were assessed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).
RESULTS:
The study included 2889 patients (199 males and 2690 females), mean age of 52.58 (±11.82) years, with a mean FIQR score of 59.22 (±22.98) and a mean FAS 2019mod of 25.50 (±8.66). Comparing the mean values of the various indices between age categories, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups for FIQR total score and FAS 2019mod. However, the 60-70 years category showed the lowest scores for both scales. The main difference emerged for the FIQR physical function subscale, where the ≥71 years category showed significantly higher scores (p<0.05) compared the 18-40 years category.
CONCLUSIONS:
The severity of FM has a significant level of stationarity according to age categories. Patients between 60-70 years have a lower disease burden. Physical function is the health domain with the most significant difference between the groups.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/od40pa

Rheumatology Article