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Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis: clinical features, treatment modalities, relapse rate in Greek patients and a review of the literature


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 

  1. 3rd Internal Medicine Department, Athens Medical School, Sotiria Hospital Athens, Greece.
  2. Department of Pathophysiology, Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
  3. Department of Internal Medicine and Autoimmune Diseases, Euroclinic Hospital, Athens, Greece.
  4. Department of Pathophysiology, Athens Medical School, Athens, and Joint Academic Rheumatology Program, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
  5. Rheumatology Unit, Sismanoglion Hospital, Athens, Greece.
  6. Department of Pathophysiology, Athens Medical School, Athens, and Joint Academic Rheumatology Program, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
  7. Department of Internal Medicine and Autoimmune Diseases, Euroclinic Hospital, Athens, and Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
  8. Department of Pathophysiology, Athens Medical School, Athens, and Joint Academic Rheumatology Program, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. agtzi@med.uoa.gr
  9. Academy of Athens, Greece.

CER14904
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PMID: 34796838 [PubMed]

Received: 16/06/2021
Accepted : 27/09/2021
In Press: 11/11/2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) is mostly idiopathic (iRPF); however, it can be secondary to drugs, malignancies, infections, or, as recently recognised, can be part of the IgG4-related diseases. The aim of our study was i) to describe the presenting clinical/laboratory/imaging features and treatment modalities used in patients with iRPF and ii) to evaluate factors potentially associated with disease relapse.
METHODS:
The medical records of patients diagnosed with iRPF and followed in four tertiary medical units in Athens, Greece from 2000 to 2018 were retrospectively evaluated.
RESULTS:
Sixty-seven patients with iRPF were included in the study. Seventy-three per cent were males, with a mean age at diagnosis 56.0±9.2 years. Low-back pain (63%) and constitutional symptoms (57%) were the commonest presenting symptoms. Elevated acute-phase reactants (78%), anaemia (43%) and impaired renal function (41%) were the most common laboratory findings. Serum IgG4 at diagnosis was evaluated in 36/67 patients and 36% of them had elevated levels (mean 297.7±166.3mg/dL). Diagnosis was mainly based on abdominal CT and/or MRI. Clinical/laboratory/radiological presentation did not differ between patients with elevated and normal serum IgG4 levels. Steroids were used as first-line treatment in 98%. Relapse occurred in 28.6% after a mean of 43.1±31.8 months. Relapse did not associate to initial clinical/imaging findings or to any treatment used, however patients with increased serum IgG4 had a significantly higher relapse rate (75% vs. 25%, p=0.005).
CONCLUSIONS:
Relapse occurred in one-fifth of patients independently of the initial clinical/radiographic presentation or treatment used. iRPF patients with baseline elevated serum IgG4 levels have a higher relapse rate.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/umzfau

Rheumatology Article