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Metabolic disturbances in systemic lupus erythematosus evaluated with UPLC-MS/MS


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

 

  1. Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung; Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei; and Ph.D. Program in Translational Medicine and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
  2. Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
  3. Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
  4. Ph.D. Program in Translational Medicine and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung; and Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
  5. Translational Medicine Laboratory; Rheumatology and Immunology Center; and College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. dychen1957@gmail.com
  6. Ph.D. Program in Translational Medicine and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine; Institute of Molecular Biology; and Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. lailai@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

CER14975
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PMID: 34874826 [PubMed]

Received: 08/07/2021
Accepted : 08/11/2021
In Press: 07/12/2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. However, no surrogate biomarker is available for SLE diagnosis or predicting disease outcomes. Here, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS)-based metabolomics strategy was executed to conduct biomarker discovery in SLE.
METHODS:
Metabolite profiles were analysed using UPLC-MS/MS analysis of serum samples obtained from the discovery cohort. Differentially expressed metabolites were identified using multivariate analyses. During the validation stage, the significant metabolites identified in the discovery cohort were quantified in a validation cohort using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS). Differences in serum metabolite levels and SLE disease activity markers were examined by using Spearman’s correlation analysis.
RESULTS:
A total of 29 significant metabolites were identified by the UPLC-MS/MS analysis. These metabolites were primarily involved in fatty acid metabolism (20.69%) and phospholipid catabolism (17.24%). In the validation cohort, 11 of 29 metabolites were quantified, which demonstrated increased levels of pyroglutamic acid and L-phenylalanine in SLE patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with lupus nephritis (LN) presented with higher taurine levels, which could serve as a biomarker. The literature review indicated decreased levels of amino acids and adenosine among SLE patients and increased lipids, low-density lipoprotein, and very low-density lipoprotein among LN patients compared to healthy controls.
CONCLUSIONS:
Fatty acid metabolism and phospholipid catabolism were affected in SLE patients. Pyroglutamic acid and L-phenylalanine have the potential to act as SLE biomarkers, and taurine might be used to distinguish patients with and without LN.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/93qonf

Rheumatology Article

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