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Adherence to treatment in Behçet’s syndrome: a multi-faceted issue


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 

  1. Institute of Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
  2. Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy.
  3. Institute of Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
  4. Institute of Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
  5. Institute of Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
  6. Associazione S.I.M.B.A (Associazione Italiana Sindrome e Malattia di Behçet), Pontedera, Italy.
  7. Institute of Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy.
  8. Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, and Rheumatology Unit, University of Pisa, Italy.
  9. Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. sara.talarico76@gmail.com

CER15039
2021 Vol.39, N°5 ,Suppl.132
PI 0088, PF 0093
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PMID: 34596034 [PubMed]

Received: 28/07/2021
Accepted : 27/09/2021
In Press: 30/09/2021
Published: 06/10/2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
The aim of this study is to explore the adherence to treatment in patients with Behçet’s syndrome (BS), to identify the diverse adherence profiles and their correlations.
METHODS:
A cross-sectional study among adult BS patients was conducted administering an ad-hoc questionnaire to BS patients with the aim of investigating several dimensions related to BS management, including attitudes towards treatment. A Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was performed to identify adherence profiles and associated characteristics were identified using logistic regression analysis.
RESULTS:
A total of 207 patients answered the survey and 180 of them declared to take medication for BS, thus representing the study population. More than a third of the respondents have declared that they have skipped treatments before and autonomously modified (reduced or increased) the dosage of the treatment without medical consultation. LCA analysis allowed the identification of two distinct profiles, one more stick with recommended medication and the other less adherent to treatment. The less-adherent BS patient profile seems to be related with being in the third decade of life, being diagnosed with BS for more than 5 years and perceiving greater psychological impact of the disease.
CONCLUSIONS:
Addressing adherence in BS is not only related to measuring treatment adherence and identifying the barriers and the limitations; in fact, it should also encompass a wider approach that includes the awareness, the socio-psychological impact of the disease as well as patient education.

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