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Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the impact on clinical features in primary Sjögren’s syndrome


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

 

  1. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, and Department of Medicine, ASL 1 Avezzano-Sulmona-L'Aquila, San Salvatore Hospital, L'Aquila, Italy. francescocarubbi@libero.it
  2. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  3. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  4. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  5. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  6. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  7. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  8. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  9. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Italy.
  10. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  11. Internal Medicine and Nephrology Unit, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.

CER15172
2021 Vol.39, N°6 ,Suppl.133
PI 0190, PF 0196
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PMID: 34874828 [PubMed]

Received: 15/09/2021
Accepted : 08/11/2021
In Press: 29/11/2021
Published: 16/12/2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
The relationship between dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, and rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) has been increasingly assessed but data on patients with established primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is lacking. The aim of the study was to explore the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and its relationship with metabolic and inflammatory features in a cohort of patients with pSS.
METHODS:
Demographic, clinical and serological data, including anthropometric parameters and cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors/events among others were collected from 91 pSS patients. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet over the previous 12 months was assessed with the 14-item PREvencion con DIeta MEDiterranea (PREDIMED) tool and the 28-item Mediterranean Lifestyle (MEDLIFE) index.
RESULTS:
According to the PREDIMED score 29 (31%) patients had a good adherence to the Mediterranean Diet, 57 (61%) a medium adherence and only 7 (8%) a poor adherence. No difference could be identified across groups with regard to demographic data, disease activity, CV risk factors or other parameters. With regard to the MEDLIFE, the total of blocks 1 and 2, that are related to Mediterranean foods and dietary habits, did not correlate with the total of block 3 (related to other healthy habits such as physical activity), meaning that the patients adhering the most to the Mediterranean Diet not necessarily had an overall healthy lifestyle. The PREDIMED score was inversely correlated with disease activity, as measured by ESSDAI (Spearman’s rho=-0.27, p=0.009) and ClinESSDAI (Spearman’s rho=-0.26, p=0.01). Fish consumption was associated with lower prevalence of hypertension.
CONCLUSIONS:
Adherence to the Mediterranean diet, with particular attention to fish consumption, may be beneficial on various domains in pSS, such as the CV system and the inflammatory environment, and as such should be recommended to patients with this disease.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/5p5x5p

Rheumatology Article