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Measuring change in inclusion body myositis: clinical assessments versus imaging


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

 

  1. The Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Center for Gene Therapy, Columbus, and the Department of Paediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA. lindsay.alfano@nationwidechildrens.org
  2. Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA.
  3. Department of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
  4. Department of Neuromuscular Diseases, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, University College London, UK.
  5. Department of Neuromuscular Diseases, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, University College London; Centre for Rheumatology, UCL Division of Medicine, University College London; and NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
  6. Department of Neurology, The University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

CER15508
2022 Vol.40, N°2
PI 0404, PF 0413
Reviews

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PMID: 35225227 [PubMed]

Received: 20/01/2022
Accepted : 31/01/2022
In Press: 07/02/2022
Published: 25/02/2022

Abstract

Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is a heterogeneous progressive inflammatory muscle disease impacting skeletal muscles in the head, neck, and limbs. Use of valid, reliable, sensitive, and standardised clinical and paraclinical outcome assessments (COA) are critical to inform both proactive clinical care and clinical trial design. Here we review clinical and imaging methods used to quantify muscle strength, size, or function in sIBM, and discuss their application to clinical practice and use in clinical trials. Considerations for future work to validate measures in this population are also discussed.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/0q2voe

Rheumatology Article