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Sociodemographic factors in fibromyalgia: results from the Italian Fibromyalgia Registry


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36

 

  1. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Messina, Italy.
  2. Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hermanas Hospitalarias, Villa San Benedetto Menni Hospital, Albese con Cassano, Como, and Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. alessandra.alciati@gmail.com
  3. Rheumatology Unit, AOU Pisana, Pisa, Italy.
  4. Rheumatology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara and Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Ferrara, Italy.
  5. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, Italy.
  6. Department of Internal Medicine, Anaesthesiologic and Cardiovascular Sciences, Rheumatology Unit, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
  7. Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy.
  8. Rheumatology Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
  9. Unit of Immunology, Rheumatology, Allergy and Rare Diseases (UnIRAR), IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
  10. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, ASST Settelaghi, Ospedale Di Circolo, Fondazione Macchi, Varese, Italy.
  11. Department of Medical Sciences, University of Trieste, UCO Medicina Clinica (SSD Reumatologia), Trieste, Italy.
  12. Clinical Unit of Rheumatology, School of Medicine, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  13. Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Divisions of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology AOUC, University of Florence, Italy.
  14. Department of Health Promotion Sciences, Maternal and Infant Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Palermo, Italy.
  15. Integrated Reference Centre of Rheumatology, ASP 7, Scicli Hospital, Ragusa, Italy.
  16. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  17. University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Italy.
  18. Rheumatology Unit, S. Maria Hospital - USL, IRCCS Institute, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
  19. Rheumatology Unit, Azienda USL di Modena, Italy.
  20. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Emergency Surgery and Organ Transplantations, University of Bari, Italy.
  21. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy.
  22. Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Science, University Polytechnic of Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy.
  23. Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Science, University Polytechnic of Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy.
  24. Rheumatology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara and Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Ferrara, Italy.
  25. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, Italy.
  26. Department of Internal Medicine, Anaesthesiologic and Cardiovascular Sciences, Rheumatology Unit, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
  27. Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy.
  28. Rheumatology Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
  29. Unit of Immunology, Rheumatology, Allergy and Rare Diseases (UnIRAR), IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
  30. Clinical Unit of Rheumatology, School of Medicine, University of L'Aquila, Italy.
  31. Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Divisions of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology AOUC, University of Florence, Italy.
  32. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.
  33. Research Laboratory and Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, IRCCS San Martino, Genova, Italy.
  34. Department of Rheumatology, Istituto Ortopedico Gaetano Pini, Casa di Cura La Madonnina, Milano, Italy.
  35. Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy.
  36. Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Science, University Polytechnic of Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy.

CER15618
2022 Vol.40, N°6
PI 1183, PF 1188
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PMID: 35748718 [PubMed]

Received: 22/02/2022
Accepted : 04/04/2022
In Press: 23/06/2022
Published: 23/06/2022

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain syndrome of unknown aetiopathogenesis. Its development and maintenance are related to the interplay of biological, psychological, and contextual factors. Among the contextual factors, sociodemographic aspects are poorly elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between sociodemographic/clinical factors and symptom severity measures using a web-based registry of patients with FM.
METHODS:
Adult patients with an ACR 2010/2011 diagnosis of FM underwent a clinical evaluation and were asked to complete questionnaires covering their sociodemographic data (gender, age, marital status, educational level), and disease-specific measures (the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), and the Polysymptomatic Distress Scale (PDS)).
RESULTS:
Data relating to 3,221 patients (3001 women and 220 men) was collected. The ANOVA showed significant difference in mean FIQR scores when the five marital conditions (cohabiter, married, separated/divorced, single, widowed) were compared (F 3.321, p<0.01). While males and females were found to have comparable FIQR scores, the interaction between gender and marital status indicated that separated/divorced males have higher FIQR scores (F 5.684, p=0.001). The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that patients who reported lower educational level experienced more severe FM symptoms, as scored with FIQR (p<0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS:
Our results indicated that being male and separated/divorced is associated to higher severity of FM symptoms, as rated with FIQR. Furthermore, a relationship between educational level and FIQR scores has been detected. This study supports the importance of collecting simple SES measures to identify environmental risk factors for FM severity.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/64963d

Rheumatology Article