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Paediatric Rheumatology

 

Evaluation of synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis using superb microvascular imaging compared with power Doppler ultrasound


1, 2, 3, 4, 5

 

  1. Diagnostic Imaging Center, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
  2. Department of Ultrasound, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Centre, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
  3. Diagnostic Imaging Center, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
  4. Diagnostic Imaging Center, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
  5. Diagnostic Imaging Center, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. shijing_sh@163.com

CER16999
Paediatric Rheumatology

purchase article

PMID: 37812475 [PubMed]

Received: 17/07/2023
Accepted : 18/09/2023
In Press: 05/10/2023

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic performance of superb microvascular imaging (SMI) in evaluation of synovial inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS).
METHODS:
Fifty-nine patients with active disease and 62 patients with inactive disease were enrolled. The synovial inflammation was evaluated via vascularity index (VI) of SMI and PDUS. The correlations between VIs and the inflammatory biomarkers were analysed by Spearman’s coefficient. Receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted to examine the prognostic value of SMI and PDUS.
RESULTS:
The VI of SMI was significantly higher than that of PDUS in JIA patients regardless of the disease activity. The SMI and PDUS VI were significantly correlated with levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA). The SMI VI was significantly higher in patients with relapse than in those with remission, and showed superior performance in predicting relapse in JIA patients with inactive disease.
CONCLUSIONS:
SMI may detect the synovial inflammation with greater sensitivity than PDUS in patients with JIA, and correlate well with the inflammatory biomarkers. SMI signal in the knees might play an important role in prediction of relapse in clinically inactive patients, thus allowing personalised treatment strategies for JIA patients.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.55563/clinexprheumatol/ksl2uy

Rheumatology Article