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Telangiectasia as a potential clinical marker of microvascular lesions in systemic sclerosis patients from EUSTAR data in China


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

 

  1. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  2. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  3. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  4. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  5. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  6. Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.
  7. Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.
  8. Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.
  9. Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.
  10. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  11. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  12. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  13. Department of Dermatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.
  14. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  15. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
  16. Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China. zengxfpumc@gmail.com

CER7760
2015 Vol.33, N°4 ,Suppl.91
PI 0106, PF 0110
Diagnosis

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PMID: 26005882 [PubMed]

Received: 20/07/2014
Accepted : 26/01/2015
In Press: 25/05/2015
Published: 31/08/2015

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To investigate the prevalence and clinical relevance of telangiectasia in Chinese patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).
METHODS:
Data from 230 SSc EUSTAR patients from Peking Union Medical College Hospital (2009–2011) that fulfilled the 1980 American College of Rheumatology SSc classification criteria were prospectively collected. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were calculated between groups with and without telangiectasia, and a six-minute walk test, pulmonary function test (PFT), transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), right heart catheterisation (RHC) and modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) were performed.
RESULTS:
96 patients (41.7%) were diagnosed with telangiectasia. There were no significant differences between patients with and without telangiectasia based on gender, age at onset, Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP) duration, or SSc classification. Disease duration both from RP onset of patients and from first non-RP manifestation of patients with telangiectasia was significantly longer than patients without (p<0.05). RP (97.9% vs. 90.3%), finger/toe sclerosis (96.9% vs. 88.1%), facial sclerosis (68.8% vs. 53.7%), digital ulcers (DUs; 40.6% vs. 23.1%), digital pitting (49.0% vs. 33.8%), joint contracture (20.8% vs. 10.4%) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate elevation (26.7% vs. 14.8%) were significantly greater in telangiectasia patients (p<0.05). There were no differences in autoantibody development between patients with and without telangiectasia (p>0.05). PFT showed that forced vital capacity (77.0±17.26 vs. 83.05±16.53, p=0.005) and diffusion capacity for CO of the lung (58.9±19.4 vs. 65.7±19.7, p=0.030) were lower, while forced expiratory volume ratio (87.02±7.8 vs. 84.33±7.1, p=0.029) was higher in SSc with telangiectasia. Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) prevalence (25.0% vs. 14.2%) was significantly greater in patients with telangiectasia.
CONCLUSIONS:
Telangiectasia are common in Chinese SSc patients and usually associated with DUs, RP, and PAH. Telangiectasia could be a clinical marker of microvascular disease in SSc.

Rheumatology Article