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The relationship between nailfold capillaroscopic assessment and telangiectasia score with severity of peripheral vascular involvement in systemic sclerosis


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

 

  1. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. yasemin_sahinkaya@hotmail.com
  2. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  3. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  4. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  5. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  6. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  7. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  8. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

CER7957
2015 Vol.33, N°4 ,Suppl.91
PI 0092, PF 0097
Diagnosis

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PMID: 25797836 [PubMed]

Received: 22/09/2014
Accepted : 12/01/2015
In Press: 23/03/2015
Published: 31/08/2015

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To determine the association of nailfold video-capillaroscopy (NVC) findings and telangiectasia score with digital ulcer (DU) history and severity of peripheral vascular involvement (PVI) in systemic sclerosis (SSc).
METHODS:
Fifty-nine SSc patients fulfilling Leroy & Medsger criteria were evaluated including telangiectasia score, disease activity and severity scores. NVC was performed according to qualitative (early, active and late patterns) and semi-quantitative assessments.
RESULTS:
When DU+ and DU- groups were compared; the mean score of capillary number (CN) was 2.0±0.5 vs. 1.4±0.7 (p<0.001), irregularly enlarged capillaries (IEC) was 1.8±0.6 vs. 1.4±0.7 (p<0.05), microangiopathy evolution score (MES) was 2.5±1.5 vs. 1.8±1.0 (p<0.05) and ‘early’ pattern was significantly less frequent in DU+ patients (1 vs. 9, p=0.016). The frequency of severe-PVI (Medsger severity score of 2–4) was 22% in females (12/54) and 80% in males (4/5). When severe and non-severe groups were compared; the mean score of CN was 2.1±0.4 vs. 1.5±0.7 (p<0.001), MES was 2.8±1.6 vs. 1.8±1.1 (p<0.05) and ‘early’ pattern was significantly less frequent in patients with severe PVI (0 vs. 9, p=0.049). The mean values of telangiectasia score were similar between groups.
CONCLUSIONS:
DU history and severe PVI in SSc were associated with capillary loss and microangiopathy. ‘Early’ NVC pattern was very rare in patients with DU history and was not found in severe PVI. Severe PVI in males was more frequent than females. Telangiectasia scores were not found to be related to PVI. NVC may be a helpful method in the assessment of SSc patients for PVI prognosis, warranting prospective studies.

Rheumatology Article