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Agreement between self-reported sleep patterns and actigraphy in fibromyalgia and healthy women


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

 

  1. Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
  2. Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada; and Department of Physiology and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
  3. Department of Sport and Informatics, Section of Physical Education and Sports, University Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain.
  4. Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
  5. Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
  6. Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
  7. Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.

CER8245
2015 Vol.33, N°1 ,Suppl.88
PI 0058, PF 0067
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PMID: 25786045 [PubMed]

Received: 26/12/2014
Accepted : 05/02/2015
In Press: 18/03/2015
Published: 18/03/2015

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To examine the agreement between objective (accelerometer) and subjective measures of sleep in fibromyalgia women (FW) and healthy women (HW). To identify explanatory variables of the discrepancies between the objective and subjective measures in FW and in HW.
METHODS:
127 diagnosed FW and 53 HW filled the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and wore the SenseWear Pro Armband (SWA) for 7 days in order to assess sleep over the last week. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) when the SWA was returned.
RESULTS:
The SWA showed greater total duration (74 vs. 88 min/day) and average duration (7 vs. 9 min) of wake after sleep onset in FW compared with HW. The PSQI showed poorer sleep quality in all the variables studied in FW than in HW (all, p<0.001), except time in bed. There was a lack of inter-method agreement for total sleep time, sleep time without naps and sleep latency in FW. Age and educational status explained the inter-method mean difference in sleep time in FW. High discrepancy in sleep time between the SWA and the PSQI was related to higher FIQ scores (p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS:
The objective measure only showed higher frequency and average duration of wake after sleep onset in FW compared with HW. The agreement between the SWA and the PSQI measures of sleep were poor in the FW group. Age, educational level and the impact of fibromyalgia might be explanatory variables of the inter-method discrepancies in FW.

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