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Homocysteine serum levels are increased and correlate with disease severity in patients with lupus erythematosus


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

 

  1. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy. dilettabonciani@hotmail.it
  2. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy.
  3. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy.
  4. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy.
  5. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy.
  6. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy.
  7. Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy.

CER8398
2016 Vol.34, N°1
PI 0076, PF 0081
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PMID: 26742563 [PubMed]

Received: 24/02/2015
Accepted : 31/08/2015
In Press: 08/01/2016
Published: 10/02/2016

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To determine homocysteine (Hcy) serum levels in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and a possible correlation with the disease activity.
METHODS:
Ninety-three patients with LE and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. For each patient, disease activity was calculated and plasma levels of Hcy was measured by enzymatic colorimetric assay.
RESULTS:
Forty-six patients had chronic cutaneous LE (CCLE), 14 had LE tumidus (LET), 17 had subacute CLE (SCLE) and 16 had SLE. Median values [25°–75° percentile] were 7[4-9] for CCLE, 3.5[2.3–4.8] for LET, and 8[7–10] for SCLE; for SLE the RCLASI score was 7.5[4.8–13] and the SELENA/SLEDAI score was 10.5[9–13.3]. HHcy was present in 73.9% of patients with CCLE, 35.7% with LET, 82.4% with SCLE, 81.2% with SLE, 20% of healthy controls. Overall, patients with LE showed a higher median serum Hcy level than the control group (15[13–18.2] vs. 11[8.8–12.2], p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between Hcy serum levels and disease activity, both in patients with CLE and SLE.
CONCLUSIONS:
We demonstrated that Hcy levels were higher in patients with different forms of CLE and correlated with disease activity calculated by CLASI. Therefore, HHcy could be related to LE pathogenesis and might be a triggering factor in predisposed individuals.

Rheumatology Article